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Hellenic Journal of Psychology 
 Psychological Society of Northern Greece


VOLUME 2, ISSUE 1 INFORMATION



HELLENIC JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY
…SSN 1790-1391

Edited three times a year by the Psychological Society of Northern Greece (PSNG)
Volume 2, Issue 1, 2005

Legally responsible:
Anastasia Efklides, President of the Psychological Society of Northern Greece
School of Psychology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 541 24 Thessaloniki, Greece.
Tel: ++30-2310-997374. Fax: ++30-2310-997384. E-mail: efklides@psy.auth.gr


Editors
Editor-in-Chief:  Anastasia Efklides Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece
Associate Editors: Maria Dikaiou
Angeliki Leondari
Georgios D. Sideridis
Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece
University of Thessaly, Greece
University of Crete, Greece
Assistant Editors: Irini Dermitzaki
Mary H. Kosmidis
Robert Mellon
Plousia Misailidi
Pagona Roussi
University of Thessaly, Greece
Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece
University of Crete, Greece
University of Ioannina, Greece
Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece
Guest Editor of Issue 1 Plousia Misailidi University of Ioannina, Greece



Editorial Board

Anastasia Efklides
Diomedes Markoulis
Markku Niemivirta
Jose M. Prieto
Yannis Theodorakis
Maria Tzouriadou
Marja Vauras
Marcel Veenman
Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece
Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece
University of Helsinki, Finland
Complutense University, Madrid, Spain
University of Thessaly, Volos, Greece
Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece
University of Turku, Finland
University of Leiden, The Netherlands


Publisher:
ELLINIKA GRAMMATA: Emm. Benaki 59, 106 81 Athens, Greece
‘el: ++30-210-3891800 - Fax: ++30-210-3836658
Bookstore: Zood. Pigis 21 & Tzavela 1, 106 81 Athens, Greece

© Copyright 2004: Psychological Society of Northern Greece (PSNG)
All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means (electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise) for commercial purposes without the written permission of the copyright own-ers. Manuscripts submitted to the journal in no case are returned back


Volume 2, Issue 1, 2005    


HELLENIC JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY
Founded 2004





YOUNG CHILDRENíS THEORY OF MIND


Guest Editor: Plousia Misailidi

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ELLINIKA GRAMMATA


 

CONTENTS


Editorial
          Anastasia Efklides......................................................................................................VII

Prologue
         Plousia Misailidi.......................... .................................................................................IX

Developing an understanding of beliefs: Some themes and controversies
         Peter Mitchell..........................................................................................................1-26

Childrenís understanding of faux pas: Associations with peer relations
         Robin Banerjee & Dawn Watling
.................................................................................27-45

Belief-emotion lag and the childís idea of heroism:
Can the curse of knowledge lift for dispositional inference?
         Norman H. Freeman & Lois Jackson ..........................................................................46-58

The concept of intention in autism: The ability of children with autism 
to distinguish prior intention from action and intention in action from 
bodily movement
        Plousia Misailidi  ......................................................................................................59-79

Commentary
Theory of mind in 2005: Old friends and old problems. Still a case for 
conceptual development
        Josef Perner...........................................................................................................80-92



Hellenic Journal of Psychology, Vol. 2 (2005), pp. IX-X

PROLOGUE 


Theory of mind has been one of the fastest growing areas of research in developmental psy-chology over the past twenty years. Work in this area investigates childrenís ability to attrib-ute mental states, such as desires, beliefs, feelings and intentions, to self and others and to use these to predict and explain behaviour. Theory of mind is an important means for making sense of the social world, and this probably explains the enormous interest in tracing its de-velopmental origins in early childhood.
      This special issue entitled ĎĎYoung Childrenís Theory of Mindíí contains five invited pa-pers that address different aspects of the young childís theory of mind. The issue begins with a theoretical paper by Peter Mitchell who compares and contrasts radical conceptual shift with simulationist explanations of belief understanding, arguing tentatively for the superiority of the latter. The second paper by Robin Banerjee and Dawn Watling attempts to sketch the rela-tion between childrenís performance on advanced tests of theory of mind (specifically the faux pas) and peer acceptance/rejection. The paper by Norman Freeman and Lois Jackson raises a little-noticed problem, namely the gap in childrenís understanding of belief and be-lief-based emotions, using as a context the results of an experimental study on childrenís un-derstanding of heroism. The fourth paper by myself explores autistic childrenís understanding of intention, specifically their ability to distinguish between the two fundamental aspects of intention: prior intention and intention in action. 
      These papers set the stage for the insightful commentary offered by Josef Perner. Perner places the contributions of this issue in a larger perspective, that of conceptual change. As-suming that theory of mind is a system of interconnected concepts (mental states), Perner em-phasizes that improvement in young childrenís understandings of intentions, emotions, de-sires, knowledge, and other states reflect genuine changes to underlying conceptual structures. Pernerís precise and penetrating commentary raises important challenges for the findings and views presented in each of the contributed papers and opens avenues for further research in the field of childrenís theory of mind. 
      I would like to express my greatest gratitude to all contributors for kindly accepting my invitation to submit their work in this special issue. I wish to especially thank Professor Josef Perner for writing the commentary of the issue. I also wish to extend my appreciation to the reviewers whose time and efforts have made this issue possible. Lastly, I am grateful to Pro-fessor Anastasia Efklides, HJPís Editor-in-Chief, for giving me the opportunity to serve as the Guest Editor for this special issue and for providing me with valuable assistance during vari-ous phases of this project. 

December 2004

Guest Editor

Plousia Misailidi
Assistant Professor